Site Maintenance

Site Maintenance

Unscheduled Maintenance We are attending to much needed fixits and upgrades. Things you might notice new to the site are a complete site redesign, the recordings have been modified to sound better and stream quicker, and we are adding cover art. The last will roll-out over time. Also the site is now served through https for secure browsing. I hope you enjoy and thanks for listening. Warren
Hop-Frog

Hop-Frog

“And madness is no comfortable feeling…”

One of my favorite stories by Edgar A. Poe. It is finely articulate, a shade humorous, and a very even bit of story telling. All this with a horrific ending. Jane has done a wonderful job, keeping the tenor of the text. Do give a listen.

Isidro

Isidro

This is a Western romance set in the mission days of Alto California.

I originally found this hardback book at a Goodwill store in Santa Fe, famous for having the best collection of junk in town. I’d never read Mary Hunter Austin’s work before and gave this 25 cent hardback a try, (at the time there were no copies online, had I searched). That night, I imediately enjoyed the rare tone to this Western theme and could already imagine it as an audiobook.

On the Brighton Road

On the Brighton Road

A man tries desperately to get where he is going.

Richard Barham Middleton (28 October 1882 – 1 December 1911) was an English poet and author, who is remembered mostly for his short ghost stories, in particular “The Ghost Ship”.

Tom O'Bedlam

Tom O'Bedlam

“For to see mad Tom O’Bedlam 10,000 miles I traveled.”

“Tom o’ Bedlam” is the name of an anonymous poem in the “mad song” genre, written in the voice of a homeless “Bedlamite.” The poem was probably composed at the beginning of the 17th century; in How to Read and Why, Harold Bloom calls it “the greatest anonymous lyric in the [English] language.”

The Happy Prince

The Happy Prince

”‘Why can’t you be like the Happy Prince?’ asked a sensible mother of her little boy who was crying for the moon. ‘The Happy Prince never dreams of crying for anything.’”

In a town where a lot of poor people suffer and where there are a lot of miseries, a swallow who was left behind after his flock flew off to Egypt for the winter, meets the statue of the late “Happy Prince,” who in reality has never experienced true sorrow, for he lived in a palace where sorrow was not allowed to enter. Viewing various scenes of people suffering in poverty from his tall monument, the Happy Prince asks the swallow to take the ruby from his hilt, the sapphires from his eyes, and the golden leaf covering his body to give to the poor.